The Largest and Most Comprehensive Independent Cardiology Practice in the Midwest.

Schedule an Appointment with Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin

Our dedicated physicians and providers are looking forward to seeing you. Call (920) 886-9380 or click here to schedule an appointment with Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin.

New Patients

If you wish to have your medical records transferred to us from another provider, hospital or physician, simply print, complete, then mail this form to our Appleton location and your records will be transferred to us.

Find a Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin clinic location

Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin serves Northeast Wisconsin with a location on the west side of Appleton. We’re off College Avenue, near the Fox River Mall and Appleton International Airport.

For the past 50 years, the doctors of Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin have provided our patients with high quality, compassionate care.

As health care continues to evolve, we have made the decision to return to private practice so we may have more control over day-to-day operations and patient care decisions. We believe that serving you as an independent cardiology group, will bring you the best experience along with the highest quality care at a lower cost.

Effective April 1, 2019, we began treating patients in our new state-of-the-art facility. This is the new home of the same cardiologists that have been providing care to northeast Wisconsin since 1968. At the Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin we are able to provide diagnostic testing, labs and common, in-office procedures. We will continue to serve our outlying communities in New London, Ripon, Shawano, and Waupaca. Your cardiologist will also continue to provide services if you are admitted to a ThedaCare hospital or Ascension St. Elizabeth. At each hospital you must specifically ask for a Heart and Vascular cardiologist.

Let us reassure you that you will continue to receive the same exceptional care you have come to expect from us. We are excited about the ways this move allows us to improve your overall health care experience. Doing what is best for our patients will always remain our highest priority.

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Do You Know The Basics Of Heart Health?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. One in five deaths is due to heart disease, even though the disease is largely preventable. Keeping your heart healthy starts with living a heart-healthy lifestyle. But first, you need to get smart about your heart. Knowing what causes heart disease, what puts you at risk for it, and how you can reduce those risks can help you make informed decisions to protect your heart and keep it strong.

Want to test your knowledge? Take this short Heart Smart Quiz:
Heart Smart Quiz
1. True or False? High blood pressure is also known as hypertension and occurs when your blood pressure is consistently 130/80 mm Hg or higher.
2. True or False? Your body mass index, or BMI, shows if your weight is in a healthy range for your height and is one measure of your future risk for heart disease.
3. True or False? Cholesterol helps make hormones, vitamin D, and substances to help you digest foods. Your body needs it for good health, but in the right amounts.
4. True or False? Eating lots of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, using fat-free or low-fat dairy products, and limiting foods high in saturated fat or sugar-sweetened beverages are all part of a heart-healthy diet.
5. True or False? Not getting enough sleep or getting poor quality sleep on a regular basis increases the risk of having high blood pressure, heart disease, and other medical conditions.
6. True or False? To strengthen their heart, adults should aim to get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as brisk walking each week.

Answer Key: All answers are True.

How did you do? Knowing your own risk factors for heart disease can help guide your lifestyle choices, so talk to your healthcare provider to make sure you’re clear. Just as important: know your numbers. Your weight, waist size, blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels all affect your heart. If they aren’t where they should be, make a pledge to begin improving them.

Adding more physical activity to your day, eating a heart-healthy diet, managing stress, getting enough quality sleep, and not smoking can put you on the path to better heart health.

Learn more about heart disease prevention from The Heart Truth® at www.hearttruth.gov and download the Heart Smart Basics fact sheet to improve your knowledge about heart health.
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Do You Know The Basics Of Heart Health?

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. One in five deaths is due to heart disease, even though the disease is largely preventable.   Keeping your heart healthy starts with living a heart-healthy lifestyle. But first, you need to get smart about your heart. Knowing what causes heart disease, what puts you at risk for it, and how you can reduce those risks can help you make informed decisions to protect your heart and keep it strong.

Want to test your knowledge? Take this short Heart Smart Quiz: 
Heart Smart Quiz
1. True or False? High blood pressure is also known as hypertension and occurs when your blood pressure is consistently 130/80 mm Hg or higher.
2. True or False? Your body mass index, or BMI, shows if your weight is in a healthy range for your height and is one measure of your future risk for heart disease.
3. True or False? Cholesterol helps make hormones, vitamin D, and substances to help you digest foods. Your body needs it for good health, but in the right amounts.
4. True or False? Eating lots of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains, using fat-free or low-fat dairy products, and limiting foods high in saturated fat or sugar-sweetened beverages are all part of a heart-healthy diet. 
5. True or False? Not getting enough sleep or getting poor quality sleep on a regular basis increases the risk of having high blood pressure, heart disease, and other medical conditions. 
6. True or False? To strengthen their heart, adults should aim to get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity such as brisk walking each week. 

Answer Key: All answers are True.

How did you do? Knowing your own risk factors for heart disease can help guide your lifestyle choices, so talk to your healthcare provider to make sure you’re clear. Just as important: know your numbers. Your weight, waist size, blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar levels all affect your heart. If they aren’t where they should be, make a pledge to begin improving them. 

Adding more physical activity to your day, eating a heart-healthy diet, managing stress, getting enough quality sleep, and not smoking can put you on the path to better heart health. 

Learn more about heart disease prevention from The Heart Truth® at www.hearttruth.gov and download the Heart Smart Basics fact sheet to improve your knowledge about heart health.

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Thank you for posting / sharing this info!

I gotta get sleep!!

👍

Heart and Vascular Institute Goes Red for Heart Month

February is National Heart Month and Friday, February 2nd is Go Red Day.

Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin cardiologist Dr. Carrie Chapman shared her thoughts about Heart Month and Go Red Day. "The reason why calling attention to cardiovascular disease is so important is because, for the past 100 years, it has been the #1 cause of deaths for Americans. On average, someone in the U.S. dies from cardiovascular disease every 30 seconds and every 3 minutes from Stroke. Unfortunately, half of all adults don't know these statistics. What makes heart disease and stroke so challenging is that cardiovascular disease can go undetected for a long period of time without obvious symptoms. Smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and poor diet can all contribute to your risk and why it is so important for everyone to know your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar levels and other routine measurements of your overall health status. But knowing these numbers is not enough. You need to increase physician activity, get enough sleep, keep your weight down through healthy eating, and either quit smoking or avoid second hand smoke to give yourself the best chance."

www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/why-half-of-u-s-adults-dont-know-heart-disease-is-the-leading-c...
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Heart and Vascular Institute Goes Red for Heart Month

February is National Heart Month and Friday, February 2nd is Go Red Day.  

Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin cardiologist Dr. Carrie Chapman shared her thoughts about Heart Month and Go Red Day. The reason why calling attention to cardiovascular disease is so important is because, for the past 100 years, it has been the #1 cause of deaths for Americans.  On average, someone in the U.S. dies from cardiovascular disease every 30 seconds and every 3 minutes from Stroke.  Unfortunately, half of all adults dont know these statistics.   What makes heart disease and stroke so challenging is that cardiovascular disease can go undetected for a long period of time without obvious symptoms.  Smoking, sedentary lifestyle, and poor diet can all contribute to your risk and why it is so important for everyone to know your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar levels and other routine measurements of your overall health status.  But knowing these numbers is not enough.   You need to increase physician activity, get enough sleep, keep your weight down through healthy eating, and either quit smoking or avoid second hand smoke to give yourself the best chance.

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/why-half-of-u-s-adults-dont-know-heart-disease-is-the-leading-cause-of-death

Comment on Facebook

Thank you, HVIW, for helping me deal effectively with cardiomyopathy and heart failure! You are the best❣️

Thank you for your insight and truthfulness. I am lucky to have you as my cardiologist!

❣️

Was here today

Thank you to all the doctors and nurses if it wasn’t for you who knows where I and many others would be today.

Increase physician activity??? I think it was supposed to say Increase physical activity but an easy oops these days. ❤ Some of us may truly need Increased physician activity to keep our risk factors low. 😊

It's true,take care. I'm still here after 15 1/2 yrs later from heart attack.

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Heart Issues Increase During The Holidays

Unfortunately, the winter holiday season has increased liklihood for heart issues.

According to Heart and Vascular Institute cardiologist Dr. Mike Frangiskakis, "From a cardiovascular risk point of view, there are a number of things to be concerned about during the holidays. First, data consistently shows that more people die from heart attacks during the last week of December than any other time of year. Specifically, more cardiac deaths occur on December 25th than any other day of the year, followed by December 26 and January 1. This is likely due to a number of factors including restricted blood flow during colder termperatures, overindulgence in food and alchhol and increased stress from traveling and social dynamics. There is also something call Holiday Heart Syndrome where excessive alcohol consumption can cause irregular heartbeat or atrial fibrillation. I strongly recommend that everyone keep up with their heart medications, consume food and alcohol in moderation, and focus on stress management. With the milder weather forecast, try and get outside for a walk every day".
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Heart Issues Increase During The Holidays

Unfortunately, the winter holiday season has increased liklihood for heart issues.   

According to Heart and Vascular Institute cardiologist Dr. Mike Frangiskakis, From a cardiovascular risk point of view, there are a number of things to be concerned about during the holidays.  First, data consistently shows that more people die from heart attacks during the last week of December than any other time of year.  Specifically, more cardiac deaths occur on December 25th than any other day of the year, followed by December 26 and January 1.  This is likely due to a number of factors including restricted blood flow during colder termperatures, overindulgence in food and alchhol and increased stress from traveling and social dynamics.   There is also something call Holiday Heart Syndrome where excessive alcohol consumption can cause irregular heartbeat or atrial fibrillation.  I strongly recommend that everyone keep up with their heart medications, consume food and alcohol in moderation, and focus on stress management.  With the milder weather forecast, try and get outside for a walk every day.

To our valued patients,

If you have tried calling our main Appleton office recently, you have likely had difficulty getting through to our call center. The reasons are simple, illness-related absences and turnover has put us in a short-staffed position on many days.

I apologize for being in this position, and want to share what we are doing about it

We have hired more staff and they are in training. The reality is that a new employee for the call center needs to learn our electronic health system and be trained on our workflows before they can be a helpful resource to take a call, schedule a patient, or get the answer to your questions. Being ready to do that does not occur in their first day, or even their first week.

The important message is that help is on the way and we appreciate your patience.

Larry Sobal, CEO
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Comment on Facebook

My first time calling to schedule my Echo, I was 29th in the "cue" to be connected! Today, Dec 6th, I am 11th in the "cue" but have been waiting so far for 22 minutes.

And if patients could call us to schedule that would be super helpful too

No wonder!

If you're a patient, sign up for the Patient Portal on our EMR. You can easily communicate with your Cardiology Team with it.

Popular place to.

Hi 👋 Larry. I have domain name for your hospital. HVIW.COM Which is a short and easy to remember and search. If you are interested to know about it more please feel free to contact me. Thanks

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Heart and Vascular Institute of Wisconsin Welcomes New Providers

Please join us in welcoming three new providers to our practice.

1) Dr. Mike Frangiskakis is a non-invasive cardiologist who joins 15 other cardiologists in our practice. He will be seeing patients at our main office in Appleton and in Shawano in addition to area hospitals.

2) Laura Anderson is a Nurse Practitioner who joins 14 other Advance Practice Providers in our practice. She will be seeing patients in our main office in Appleton in addition to area hospitals.

3) Tom Mcinnis is a Nurse Practitioner who joins 14 other Advance Practice Providers in our practice. He will be seeing patients in our Oshkosh office and at Mercy Medical Center in Oshkosh.
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Comment on Facebook

So happy to have these new providers on board. Welcome!!!

Welcome!

Yay Tom! We can’t wait to work with you at Mercy!

Wonderful news for patients in Oshkosh

Where in Shawano is Dr Frangiskakis located? TY

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